The Lowdown on Uninsured Motorist Insurance

Getting involved in a car accident translates to mounting expenses on your part. For this reason, carrying an insurance policy can help alleviate the potential expenses that will come your way especially if you were deemed at fault. But nothing can be extremely disappointing than realizing that the other driver involved in the accident does not carry any insurance.

The Insurance Research Council revealed that 1 out of every 7 drivers in the United States is currently uninsured. According to the website of Habush Habush & Rottier S.C.®, many insurance policies will still provide coverage even if the other driver involved does not have insurance. Most states require liability insurance but how will an uninsured motorist coverage protect you?

Chances are the other driver will carry liability insurance but then it will not be enough to pay for medical bills for any  injuries that you may incur. With uninsured motorist coverage, the driver without a policy can pay for the bills associated with the accident. Uninsured motorist coverage includes the following:

  • Bodily Injury covers medical expenses, lost wages, emotional distress, pain and suffering and others. However, it does not cover damages resulting from collision. It may also offer coverage for injuries to passengers or family members
  • Property Damage pays for damages to your vehicle but does not cover bodily injuries

Once you decide to purchase uninsured motorist coverage, you need to choose the limits that are right for you. In many states, the minimum limit is already set for you but you can opt to increase the limits which may be the wise thing to do.

Split Limits

In split limit, the coverage differs if only a single person is involved compared to when there are several people involved. A typical example is $15,000 for bodily injury or death per person or $30,000 bodily injury or death per accident.

Combined Single Limits

A combined single limit is paid out for by your provider for all bodily injuries in an accident.

Uninsured auto insurance is required by law in 22 states including Washington D.C. while in other states such as California, it is an additional option for mandatory liability insurance.

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