Does My Case Qualify for Personal Injury?

There are many facets to cases involving personal injury. After all, there are so many variables to consider and so many different permutations of these factors that every single case is different – but there are some key similarities that certain cases are allowed to be grouped together.

Let’s break down from something simple. Personal injury, according to the website of the Chris Mayo Law Firm, is an injury that is dealt onto a person due to the negligent actions (whether ‘tis ignorantly or willfully done) of another person or party. This injury can be physical, mental, or emotional in kind – or any combination of the three or all of them together.

From quite a vague definition, there are several instances that can come to mind that might then be qualified for a personal injury case. For example, if an swiveling office chair breaks apart under your weight, there could be a party at fault. You may have been bruised due to the fall and, if this happened in public, the incident might have subjected you to a bit of humiliation. For all intents and purposes, this can qualify for personal injury – going on the simple definition alone, right?

It is dependent on the circumstances. Technically, that kind of situation could qualify for a personal injury case but the effort and cost would not be worth it to pursue in a court of law. Any personal injury lawyer worth their salt can advise you against that course of action. It is gathered from the website of Williams Kherkher that people tend to file for personal injury lawsuits in order to receive compensation since the injury that was dealt upon them inconveniences their lives so much so that it is necessary to demand for justice in this regard.

A fall from a chair is different from, say, a broken piece of chair accidentally stabbing you clean through the leg. Personal injury cases are quite circumstantial and are, since they happen to individuals at a time, quite personalized and it would be advisable to consult with an experienced professional before pursuing legal action.

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